Research Projects for Non-Academic Readers

The following are snippets of topics I either am researching or plan to research:

1) What philosophers have to say about truth: a brief history

2) Causation and climate change: why the concept of causation is essential to understanding the concept of climate change

3) What philosophers have to say about the mind:

a) artificial intelligence and personhood;

b) consciousness, identity, and “the singularity”;

c) non-human animals as persons

4) What philosophers have to say about corporate personhood: philosophical approaches to legal personhood (and whether or not a corporation can be a moral person)

5) What philosophers have to say about rights: a focus on abortion

6) The phenomenology of human dignity: How the subjective experience of the self yields the concept of my moral worth

Author: girlzillawrites

I am a philosophy professor and writer with a diverse set of research interests. My favorite courses to conduct are all introductory: critical thinking, symbolic logic, ancient philosophy, early modern philosophy, social and political philosophy, and ethics. My philosophical loves are Kant and Kierkegaard, but I happen to be smitten pretty much with whoever I'm reading at the moment.

3 thoughts on “Research Projects for Non-Academic Readers”

  1. What’s the status on these non-academic topics? I’m interested in #5, of course. I have a view about #6. #4 still baffles me, to be frank. I’d like to hear what your thesis is for #2. Are you still in Rhode Island?

    1. Thanks for writing! I hope we can catch up in person when I return to L.A. We’re just about to leave R.I…

      Some of the projects are somewhat on hold as I gear up the the fall semester. I tackled #4 in an essay for “Mr. Robot and Philosophy”, but it was just a start on what I take to be a really interesting topic. There are some good reasons for the law to recognize corporations as persons—”legal fictions”—but there are some thorny issues…

      #2 is planned as a way to think about the concept of causation—climate change is the entree. So, for example, when we read Aristotle or Hume, we could work to understand their conceptions of causation as they would play out in explaining climate change as the result of (overly simple, I know) industrialization.

      1. When will the essay/book be published? Do you have a copy of the essay as a pdf that I can find on the internet — like on Academia, or on the Pierce website, etc?

        As for #2, it sounds like a huge task.

        I’m actually in Andover, MA right now. I’m not in LA. But we could just continue to catch up via posts and email like this. Unless you can come to Andover for some coffee or lunch, or even dinner with me. I can probably make it over to the Boston-Logan airport at a certain time/day, if your flight plan somehow involves on stopping by as a layover or something like that, and we can catch up for a while during your layover at the airport. Please email me if you want. Do you know it?

What do you think?